The Cloud-Star technology blog brings you the latest news and comment from the Mobile Communications industry including: IoT, 4G LTE, 5G and other mobile technologies.





Telit, a global enabler of the Internet of Things (IoT), today announced a new partnership with Kumpan, the electric scooter designer and manufacturer on a mission to ensure the next wave of classic European scooters are completely electric, silent and connected. Providing a full range of best-in-class products, Telit is equipping Kumpan with an all-in-one solution to ensure its new 1954 Ri electric scooter delivers on its promise to make ridesharing simple.

Kumpan’s e-scooter sharing solutions includes front and backend management systems:


  • Live tracking with free floating and stationary sharing locations

  • User registration, booking of scooters and payment processing via the app

  • Rentals and returns, as well as, service planning and management

  • Ridesharing, fleet tracking and optimization of utilization analyses

  • Open APIs for connection to any fleet-management software


The overall growth in the shared mobility market has exponentially increased in the past three years. Multiple reports from 2019 indicate an increase from 2018 in the number of countries and cities that implemented scooter sharing systems, with the number of registered users jumping significantly worldwide.

Telit’s solution includes:


  • Cellular and Bluetooth modules – form factors designed to fit any project to use anywhere.

  • Telit simWISE connectivity – provides greater flexibility and functionality than a standard SIM card at a much lower cost with added convenience. With integrated cryptographic capabilities, it connects to any carrier network.

  • Telit IoT Platform – allows for connecting, integrating and managing, with visibility, control, interoperability and intelligent insights across the global IoT value chain.


“We have long envisioned e-scooter sharing as a steppingstone in the mobility revolution and needed a partner to help us realize our goal of designing and producing a tailor-made electric scooter perfect for the sharing market,” said Philipp Tykesson, co-founder and chief sales and marketing officer at Kumpan. “Telit offered us a full range of products in an all-in-one solution that not only simplified our internal processes but also opened for us new horizons while enabling overall growth and expansion as we work toward tackling critical transportation and sustainability challenges.”


“We are proud to partner with a visionary company like Kumpan, whose e-scooters are improving—directly and indirectly—the everyday lives of its customers,” said Carlos Perez, president sales at Telit. “It also validates our leadership in providing forward-thinking and environmentally conscious enterprises with embedded, secure connectivity solutions that enable them to enter and compete in emerging markets.”


Source: Telit




The increase in traffic congestion, together with the rise in the number of road accidents, is expected to drive the growth of the ITS market between now and 2024.


The North American region led the intelligent transport system market in 2019 The intelligent transport system (ITS) market is forecast to grow by $32.47 billion between 2020 and 2024, due to increased traffic congestion and road accidents, a new study finds. The predicted growth of smart cities during the forecast period is expected to have a positive impact on the market and contribute to its growth significantly. Intensified congestion According to Technavio, growing urbanisation and the ever-rising use of cars, resulting from the rising middle-class population, are intensifying traffic congestion. These factors are far more prevalent in developing countries, and, as a result, government organisations are seeking to implement ITS solutions such as congestion charging, road user charging and electronic toll collection to control traffic. The market research report highlights the Indonesian government, which has partnered with Kapsch TrafficCom and Q-Free to provide tolling equipment to its road transportation sector. “Factors such as the growing popularity of smart factories, and the growing use of data centre management will have a positive impact on the growth of the intelligent transport system market.” Digital technologies include ITS solutions such as traffic control and safe and intelligent transportation. The use of such technologies will help to analyse and efficiently utilise resources. It will also improve transportation facilities leading to faster connectivity. “Factors such as the growing popularity of smart factories and the growing use of data centre management will have a positive impact on the growth of the intelligent transport system market during the forecast period,” the report states. The market research report segments the ITS market by application (traffic management, toll management, automotive and infotainment telematics, public transport and others), and geography (North America, Europe, APAC, South America, and Middle East and Africa (MEA)). The North American region led the ITS market in 2019, followed by Europe, APAC, South America and MEA. During the forecast period, the North American region is expected to register the highest incremental growth due to factors such as the increased adoption of ITS solutions by end-user industries, the shift from conventional transportation systems to intelligent transportation systems, growth in end-user industries, and government initiatives for the implementation of ITS solutions. Technavio is a global technology research and advisory company which focuses on emerging market trends.


Source: Sue Weeks-Smart Cities World

  • Tim Cosgrove



 

Strategies must take a holistic approach encompassing people, institutions, structures and operations, say Clint Vince, founder of Dentons’ Smart Cities and Communities Think Tank, and Jennifer Morrissey, counsel at Dentons.


The urgent mandates issued to cities in areas such as climate change and rapid urbanisation are frequently discussed under the rubric of “smart cities” but just what constitutes a smart city is elusive. A successful smart strategy should take a holistic approach encompassing people, institutions, structures and operations across the connected ecosystem that makes up the city or community. While there is necessarily much overlap among the components, a successful smart cities programme should focus simultaneously on 14 key pillars. Government leadership and public policy Building smart communities requires public officials at all levels of government to evaluate and implement the best solutions for their constituents’ most pressing problems. This is challenging at present. Whether by default or design, there is a lack of comprehensive decision-making. As city and community needs change and technologies advance, there must be room for experimentation, change and even failure and learning. Because development of a smart city requires breaking down bureaucratic silos and cooperating across city and community institutions, strong leadership and creative thinking are needed to implement engagement strategies, build consensus and set a plan in motion. Policy structures must also be established to enable and nurture the evolution of smart city programmes. Importantly, leaders must also be courageous. As city and community needs change and technologies advance, there must be room for experimentation, change and even failure and learning. Regulation Regulatory structures at all levels must be assessed and adapted to accommodate deployment and adoption of new technologies and systems, while ensuring the trust and security of the people impacted. This ranges from creating incentives for businesses of all sizes to invest in advanced technologies, to efficiently designing regulations that lower development costs and speed of deployment. It also entails regulatory attention to privacy and cybersecurity risks. This all requires a degree of future-proofing to ensure that the community can continue to leverage the benefits of ever-evolving technological advancements. Technology and innovation Technology is the rapidly accelerating driver of smart cities and communities. Not an end in itself, technology, when properly harnessed, facilitates modernisation, but can also allow cities to improve the enjoyment of everything that the community values. Leveraging advanced technologies does not mean that everything is new. A successful smart strategy should take a holistic approach encompassing people, institutions, structures and operations across the connected ecosystem that makes up the city or community. Advanced analytics enable integration of and improvements to existing systems. For example, by identifying data that is already collected for other purposes and using it to drive decisions and operations, and to provide new services in an efficient, innovative and cost-effective manner, constrained budgets can be optimised. Telecommunications Devices, people, businesses and government must all be able to connect quickly and securely to share data to improve daily activities. A meaningful smart and connected community strategy must contemplate how to pave the way for advanced telecommunications networks, including advocating policies to promote deployment of wireless connectivity infrastructure. It must also facilitate development of compatible firmware and hardware to support today’s needs while looking forward to enable the digital and information technologies of tomorrow. Cyber and physical security and privacy Interconnectivity creates risk. Many existing brick, mortar and hard-wired systems were intentionally developed to be isolated in order to reduce risk of intrusion. The digital economy, however, depends on connected interoperability. Cities and communities must craft approaches that simultaneously mitigate risk and maximise interconnectivity in order to realise benefits on a widespread scale. This involves engaging with researchers, technologists, policymakers and stakeholders to create systems that are physically secure, and that protect privacy while allowing for data-gathering and sharing to devise solutions to perennial and novel challenges faced by society. Finance, investment and economic development The elephant in the room in nearly every smart cities discussion is the question: who will pay for it? Because of the varied benefits that flow from smart infrastructure modernisation, many initiatives do not fit neatly within traditional municipal budgets or financing models. Creativity is required, involving reaching across sectors. Some innovative public-private partnerships are beginning to emerge, as well as use of traditional funding mechanisms such as rate base for electrical and water utility improvements. Government, industry, philanthropy and community-based organisations all have an interest in making the smart approach work for inhabitants and may be poised to invest. There is no single solution. Some innovative public-private partnerships are beginning to emerge, as well as use of traditional funding mechanisms such as rate base for electrical and water utility improvements. Optimum funding strategies may be identified from existing and untapped sources of capital, and new revenue streams. Transportation and mobility Reliable, efficient transportation and mobility infrastructure connects people with goods, services, employment, opportunities and one another. When transportation infrastructure is powered by advanced technology, countless benefits are realised: reduced emissions and congestion from widespread use of electric car shares and automated vehicles; enhanced public safety from smart monitoring, reporting and routing of responders; economic development as underserved communities are connected with employment and development opportunities through data-driven mass transit. It is fundamental to a modern, thriving economy. Energy Smart cities are electrified cities. Energy management is an essential component of any smart city strategy for purposes of reliability, efficiency and affordability. Far beyond replacing light bulbs, efficiency involves dynamic technology-based measures that allow a utility to control use or automate conservation. It incorporates a multi-directional grid and advanced technology solutions that include a broad array of distributed energy resource and demand response, together with cost-effective means of ensuring reliability of service. Water, wastewater and waste Changing patterns in hydrology and higher expectations of reliability and quality of municipal water supplies require cities to critically examine water resources and delivery infrastructure from source to end-users. Smart technologies can be used to monitor and manage delivery systems; enhance storage, treatment and recycling; and educate the public on conservation. With increasing population density, cities are also melding policy requirements, sustainability goals and technology to manage wastewater and solid waste. Approaches to issues from recycling to long-term waste management, reduction and processing, to externalities such as fleet emissions and human behaviour, all represent opportunities for innovative, data-driven solutions. City and green space planning and buildings The physical spaces in which residents live, work and play are critical. Smart buildings that encourage productivity and efficiency are becoming foundational blocks for cleaner, healthier cities and communities. Urban green spaces have become an essential component of sustainability and livability, bringing far more than aesthetics to city environments. For example, green roofs help with energy and water management, while vertical farming contributes to food access. Benefits range from pollution abatement to pest control to soil conditions to physical and mental wellbeing so these spaces should be an integral part of city planning. Environment, health and safety Sustainability, public safety and health are primary policy concerns for community leaders and residents that should be woven into every aspect of city development, operations and services. The proven correlation between cities’ environmental performance and their prosperity supports the pursuit of initiatives to rapidly accelerate cleaner, healthier, more viable growth through greening of urban infrastructure investments in efficiency and renewable energy technologies, and corresponding regulatory reform. A community can only thrive if its members are interacting with and leveraging the resources and available services in a comprehensive, efficient, cost-effective and equitable manner. Smart technologies offer myriad possibilities for improving health and safety. Among these are sensor technologies to monitor street and neighbourhood conditions, and mobile and remote health care services that improve quality of life for ageing populations by reducing dependence on hospitals or nursing homes. Consumer engagement and community social infrastructure Building broad community support for smart cities programmes is a complex process that requires significant outreach and collaboration with community anchor institutions, social service agencies, residents, businesses and other stakeholders. A community can only thrive if its members are interacting with and leveraging the resources and available services in a comprehensive, efficient, cost-effective and equitable manner. The development of the smart strategy should involve public participation by those who will benefit or be impacted by it. A city or community is first and foremost about its people. NGOs and universities While developing smart infrastructure plans, local governments should engage with universities and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to provide intellectual firepower and nurture public trust. Many of these institutions already serve as incubators for pilot projects. They have longstanding success rates in collaboration, entrepreneurship and interdisciplinary approaches to projects. They also enjoy licence to experiment and even fail, which leads to learning and development of better outcomes. Global best practices Every city and community has its own history, culture and set of priorities. Nevertheless, cities and communities all over the planet are wrestling with similar issues of how to meet the needs of inhabitants sustainably and cost-effectively. Exploding populations and massive trends of urban migration, particularly in the global south, mean that many innovative solutions will be brought to scale in those locations. Communities everywhere can learn and benefit from what has been tested and applied in other cities and adapt these solutions to meet their individual priorities. At the same time, many cities and communities across the globe are working on transformative technologies with broad application for smart cities and communities. Communities everywhere can learn and benefit from what has been tested and applied in other cities and adapt these solutions to meet their individual priorities. Source:  Clint Vince: Chair of Dentons’ Smart Cities and Communities Think Tank.